Sunday, February 25, 2007

More reviews? Yes, please

We were treated to a pleasant surprise upon opening this month's Performer Magazine, which features a full-page ad for our March 24 show at Great Scott with Hallelujah the Hills and Lady of Spain AS WELL AS a really awesome CD review! It's not online yet, so I can't link, but pick up a copy if you can. I'll type in the text below.

Cassavettes- It's Gonna Change
PRODUCED BY JABE BEYER & CASSAVETTES
ENGINEERED BY JABE BEYER AT HI-N-DRY IN CAMBRIDGE, MA
MIXED BY JABE BEYER AT HI-N-DRY AND THE DOLLHOUSE IN ALLSTON, MA
MASTERED BY IAN KENNEDY AT NEW ALLIANCE EAST IN CAMBRIDGE, MA

Certainly the title of Cassavettes' first full-length album could refer to any number of things, not the least of which might be the Boston music scene itself. Cassavettes' sound resides outside the cliches of Boston's mainstream rock genre, and while they might find a home amongst the folkies, their mix of country, folk, and rock doesn't really fit there, either. Perhaps it all comes from the band's Texas roots; their country leanings seem to carry a Southern authenticity that is often lacking in Northeastern country acts. But in the same way that Texas isn't really part of the South, Cassavettes isn't really country. The same could be said about any of the styles one can pick out in their sound. It's as if they've distilled the geographic qualities of Texas -- on the border, but not across it, familiar, yet close to foreign -- into a musical quality.

The album opens with the haunting "The Nadir." This track clearly demonstrates the Neil Young influence that Cassavettes readily admit -- not by mirroring Young's signature vocal style, but by focusing on the laid-back rock/country musical and the storyteller lyrical style. It is this storyteller quality, in fact, which is as much a defining quality of Cassavettes as their genre-bending. The proceeding three songs, "Debts," "On Our Own" and "Trouble From The Start," all follow this lyrical formula with great results.

"Seasons" breaks into more abstract ground lyrically, aiming more to capture a feeling than tell a story. The song also showcases a memorable a capella moment by the band. A jazzy intro sets "Lightning In A Bottle" apart from the rest of the album before the same almost-country sound that is Cassavettes' signature settles in for the majority of the song, with occasional reappearances from the jazzy guitar riff. This moment effectively demonstrates an important Cassavettes quality: their songs encompass a degree of variety that keeps things interesting, even as they show an impressive consistency. Even the rowdy "Shine A Light" still fits the mold.

If you like the first cut, then it actually isn't going to change -- all of "It's Gonna Change" will satisfy. And it is not a stretch to predict that many will like that first taste and come back for more. (self-released)
www.cassavettesmusic.com
-Brian McGrath


Pretty awesome, eh? I think it's one of our best reviews yet! I especially like the part about variety but keeping things interesting. That's the goal!

Also, last night's fun has now made it into the local press. Good friend Bobby Hankinson of the Globe's Sidekick section wrote a bit about our rendition of "I'll Make Love To You" and embedded the clip. Check it here.

Finally, I just took a trip to Newbury Comics where we now have our own "Cassavettes" divider, rather than having our CD in the "C Miscellaneous" section. I know it's geeky to get excited about that, but it is the first time. That's a moment to remember!

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5 Comments:

Blogger Tara said...

"in the same way that Texas isn't really part of the South, Cassavettes isn't really country" - what a perfect simile! would that be a simile? i'm not so sure now. either way, a great descriptive comparison.

25 February, 2007 18:55  
Anonymous glenn said...

simile -- like or as. but that does have an implied like or as with the phrase "in the same way" which could easily be substituted with "just as texas..." or "like texas..."
but still it doesnt feel like a simile to me. allusion, perhaps.

26 February, 2007 07:47  
Anonymous Mike said...

An allusion is confined to the use of a literary reference in a seperate piece of literature, I believe. For example, in the song "The Weight" the references to Carmen, Luke, and Moses are allusions.

03 March, 2007 07:19  
Blogger cassavettes said...

only literary? that seems too confining. but it very well may be the case.

05 March, 2007 08:38  
Blogger Tara said...

I believe these links may be useful;

Allusion:
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/allusion

Alluding:
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/alluding

05 March, 2007 09:04  

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